Pharmaceutical Drugs and Their Side Effects – Do You Know Them?

The side effects of statin drugs that most don’t know about and the medical profession won’t tell. While the psychological side effects and of the serious problems drugs can bring on is seldom talked about or any warning given by the medical profession. There is a strong link between statins violence and aggression. Even to the likelihood for some statin users to have a higher homicidal behavior including death from suicides or accidents. The use of drugs is everyone’s own choice but it is important to understand the effects of pharmaceutical drug use, both immediate and long-term. Gambling and sex addiction can as well be included in side effects from the medicine that’s destroying lives. There were other instances of compulsive eating, smoking and hyper sexuality.

A woman in here fifties comes out and said, my medication makes me gamble. Checking on here past, she never been a gambler, there was no history of addiction in her family. She lost hundreds of thousands of dollars including all her family heirlooms. She was taking a medication called DOPAMINE AGONIST, often prescribed to people with Parkinson’s and restless leg syndrome, which made people have compulsive behaviors. The woman finished up being bankrupt, she died several years later of health complications.

Other incidents besides of compulsive gambling were compulsive eating, smoking, hyper sexuality. A woman was driving at 200 KM an hour, another is shoplifting compulsively, another one had compulsive creativity, she wasn’t eating or sleeping, all she did was create artwork. These people were in an ongoing cycle; their compulsive behaviors were adding to their stress. As this cycle continued, they took more medication which added more to their behaviors. What makes matters even worse, their doctors didn’t know of all the side effects, because the pharmaceutical companies hadn’t told them.

According to studies there was a strong link between the medication and compulsive behavior. Because of strong evidence a class action has been taken, the drug company paying millions of dollars in damages, and the medication now must have a warning on the box.

Some other common side effects of any prescription drugs are often constipation, diarrhoea, gastrointestinal issues, such as nausea. Any of these drugs will go through the digestive system and being absorbed which can cause pain, drowsiness, and skin reactions. Another drug often prescribed for cholesterol known as PCSK 9 that can lower the LDL level to an unheard dangerous low. Such a low level can increase the risk of many diseases and as well kill a person.

Scientific studies have proven that violence and death was more common in people with low cholesterol levels. This brings us to the point: One of the greatest myths of modern medicine is that cholesterol is bad and evil. The fact is: Good cholesterol is made by the body and none of us could survive without it. Our body needs it and it plays an important role in its many functions. Drugs work by blocking a substance your blood needs to make cholesterol, which is interfering with the natural function of the body to make good cholesterol.

There are a record number of patients suffering or even dying as a result of prescription drug site effects.

Nearly all medications, both over the counter and prescription have dangerous after effects, anything from muscle aches, pain and even death. Each year in America alone, almost five million people visit their doctor or any emergency services because of adverse prescription side effects. Prescription drugs are supposed to undergo stringent testing and clinical trials and yet it still happens? Only in rare cases, some of the drugs being recalled or removed from the market, usually only than when drugs have been known to cause either slow or immediate death.

Over the counter medicines are just as harmful and often the cause of overdose. Any common laxatives, pain-killer or sleeping pills can have serious side effects. Just the misuse of laxatives or taking too many of them can cause dehydration, kidney damage and heart problems. Pain killers and sleeping pills, people are of the opinion because they are readily available over the counter they are safe to take, not so.

Most pharmaceutical drugs are only treating the symptoms, as opposed to addressing the underlying problem. Taking any type of medicine it is important being vigilant about it. Read the fine print on the packaging, ask lots of questions, and make sure you get all the answers. The manufacturer who makes it, the doctor who recommends it and the person who sells it, they are not affected by it, you are. It goes into your body not theirs. They are making the profit. Keep in mind: Every drug you take has a risk factor!

Interview: Elliott Kalb

Elliott Kalb is a five-time Sports Emmy winner, working for NBC Sports for 15-years, and currently for HBO Sports, TNT, and CBS-Westwood One Radio Network. Known to many as Mr. Stats, he’s written two books, posted an excellent article with us and now he sits down with me to answers some questions.

Who’s been your favorite interview so far? Most surprising?

Since I’ve been promoting my books, my favorite interview has been Hall of Famer Rick Barry, who hosts a talk show on KNBR in SF. He told me that I should have ranked him 24th all time, since that was the number he always wore. I ranked him 22nd.

Over the years, I’ve had a chance to interview (or write questions for) most great athletes of the last two decades. My favorite was talking to Pat Riley about his ability to teach and motivate. I asked him if he felt he was wasting years teaching (mainly) to 12-millionaires, rather than hundreds of young people in a classroom. Riley is a tremendous interview.

What’s the most memorable sports moment you witnessed live?

Where do I begin? I produced NBC’s baseball coverage from the 2000 Sydney Olympics, where the USA team defeated a heavily favored Cuba team. I was there at the 1988 World Series, when Kirk Gibson hit a miraculous homer. I was there for each of Michael Jordan’s 35 NBA Finals games. Super Bowl XXIII, when Joe Montana led a last minute comeback. The last two Super Bowls, when the Patriots narrowly defeated the Panthers and Eagles. Game 7 of the 2003 Western Conference Finals between the Kings and Lakers. Game 7 of the 2000 Western conference Finals, when the Lakers overcame a 15-point defecit to the Trailblazers. Game 7 of the 1997 World Series. Game 7’s are almost always memorable.

Who’s your all-time sports hero?

Wilt Chamberlain was my hero growing up. I’ve been chronicling the career of Shaquille since he came into the NBA, and very proud that I was the first to write that he was the best of all time.

What’s been the harshest criticism of your “Who’s Better, Who’s Best? in Basketball” book?

That I ranked Shaq first merely to sell books.

What’s your reaction to the Congressional hearings with MLB regarding steroid use?

If Congress wanted truly to help kids (as they said) they would worry about stopping the sale of alcohol at sports events. Congress found a way to look good. Bud Selig was made to look a fool. Of course, he wants a tougher steroids policy, but his hands are tied by the players association and Don Fehr.

Who do you think will be the #1 pick in this year’s NFL Draft? Why?

I follow the NFL, the NBA, and MLB very closely. I’m afraid I don’t have the time to follow college football the same way. I do know the Niners need a quarterback, and the Dolphins need a running back.

When the next group of players is picked, who do you think should be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame?

One of the best trios of all time left the game in 2001. Tony Gwynn, Cal Ripken, Jr. and Mark McGwire. When it is their turn, I am looking forward to that. Guys like Tony Perez or the recently retired Roberto Alomar are close, but no cigar in my opinion.

Do you think gambling hurts or helps collegiate sports? Professional sports?

I love fantasy leagues, but I think they are starting to hurt sports because anytime players and/or fans care more about individual stats than team goals, it hurts the sport. No doubt pools help interest in the NCAA tournament.

Do you miss the NHL? Do you know anyone that does?

I’m afraid I’m not much of a hockey fan. I feel for the many people who make their income off of the sport, though.

Do you think professional women’s leagues like the WNBA will succeed in the long run? Why?

The women’s leagues have created a niche. It will never rival the main sports, but I am happy for those involved and the people that enjoy them.

What do Bob Costas, Cris Collinsworth, Dan Marino and Chris Carter think of TheSportsCritics.com?

They all enjoy debating the issues, so I’m sure they would like the site.

When will your book signing tour make it to Southern California?

I will be in Los Angeles on Thursday, April 14.

It’s draft time and the following people make up the draft for your sports organization. Which people are FIRST ROUND picks, which are LAST ROUND picks and which go UNDRAFTED? Why?

Barry Bonds

FIRST ROUND – Greatest baseball player of all time.

Michael Jordan

FIRST ROUND – Greatest non-center to ever play in the NBA.

Pete Rose

LAST ROUND – As a manager, he bet on his own team some days, which means he bet against his team on others…that’s what I have a problem with.

Bill Parcells

FIRST ROUND – I worked with Bill and I am one of his guys. A Jersey guy. A guy he can hang with at the diner. A guy that is loyal to him, and would go through a wall for. He needles me, gets on my case, and made me work twice as hard for him as anyone else.

Jose Canseco

LAST ROUND – I wrote a better baseball book than him–an old fashioned baseball book that could have been written at any point in time…but this schmuck has the best-seller?

Kobe Bryant

LAST ROUND – I wrote in the NBA book almost two years ago, that any great perimeter player (Tracy McGrady, for instance) would have won those three titles that Kobe won. Shaq made the difference. He has proven me correct.

Bill Buckner

SECOND ROUND – I still think of him as a batting champ, an excellent hitter, and he should have been replaced for defense in the 9th inning of Game 6 of the 1986 WS.

Brett Favre

LAST ROUND – Still can’t stomach him after he let Strahan sack him intentionally for record.

Billy Martin

Very underrated manager…and as a longtime Yankees fan, he’ll always have a place in my heart.

Bobby Knight

FIRST ROUND – I like Parcells, so I like Knight. Of course. He represents so much about what is good for his sport.

Mark Cuban

FIRST ROUND – Owners I like more than him: Al Davis, the Maloof brothers. Also, although he wasn’t an owner, Pat Croce has been a friend, role model, and the real deal.

Pedro Martinez

FIRST ROUND – One of the greatest of all time. I ranked him 29th all time, and he’ll be better than Koufax if he does anything in the back end of his career.

Terrell Owens

Who’s Better, Who’s Best? I’ll take Randy Moss and Teri Hatcher over T.O. and Nicolette Sheridan.

The Unruly Judge

G ambling was both legal and wide open in Albuquerque. Town authorities relied heavily on the sale of saloon licenses and fines imposed for disturbances at the gambling tables to help maintain the municipal government. As towns sprouted in the 19th-century American West-outside Army forts, at river crossings along wagon trails, in mining districts and at railheads-some of the first structures built were recreational facilities. Recreation for the almost totally male population inevitably meant Three-W vices of the frontier-whiskey, whoring and wagering.

Since no stigma was attached to games of chance, distinguished pillars of the community indulged openly. One prominent gambling addict was the town’s leading magistrate, Judge William C. Heacock. He could be found most nights whiling away his time dealing three-card Monte in his favorite Albuquerque saloon Dealers banked their own games. If they made money, it was theirs. If they lost, it was out of their own pocket. Judge Heacock loved playing three-card Monte in the backroom of a saloon in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He also presided over Albuquerque’s night court, which he opened and closed at his own discretion. When the judge suffered a bad losing streak, he called in a town deputy and said, “Get me a drunk with money in his pockets that is guilty of disorderly conduct.” Judge Heacock’s widow told an interviewer of one incidence in which the judge ran out of money. Deputies were dispatched to find a drunk. The deputies soon returned carrying a limp man between them. “What the Hell?” asked the judge? “What’s that you got? “Your honor,” replied a deputy, as he laid his burden on the floor, “we found him in the back room of the Blue Indigo.” “Can he stand trial or is he dead drunk?” asked the judge. “He’s not drunk, but he’s dead all right. He croaked himself over there in the Blue Indigo and the proprietor insisted we get him out of there.” This annoyed the judge. “Didn’t the fools ever hear of an inquest?” he asked. Heacock had sent for a lucrative drunk, not a drooling suicide. The judge turned to his deputies. “This court is a court of justice. The right of habeas corpus must not be ignored. The prisoner must be given a speedy and fair trial. This court is ready to hear evidence. What is the charge?” “Your Honor,” said a deputy, “The charge has not yet been determined.” “This court will hear no case without a charge. Did you search the prisoner?” “There was a letter to some dame-“began the deputy.” “Any money?” The deputy counted out $27.32. “Any weapons?”

A deputy produced a gun found in the dead man’s hip pocket. “Has the prisoner anything to say before sentence is imposed upon him?” The judge cocked his ear toward the dead prisoner, listening for a response. “In view of the unresponsiveness of the prisoner, which this court interprets as contempt, and in view of the unlawful possession of a lethal weapon, this court imposes a fine of $20.00 and court costs,” pronounced the judge. “You might as well leave him there till morning,” the judge instructed his deputies, pocketing the money. The judge returned to his Monte game in the saloon below with enough money to continue dealing. His wife remembered well enough the shack she and Judge Heacock lived in-you couldn’t call it a house-for there weren’t any real houses in Albuquerque in those days. The shack was on South Second Street where it was replaced by the Crystal Beer Garden. It was a dusty spot and she wanted her husband to buy a little land near Robinson Park where there were a few trees and a pump. She would have been satisfied with a one-room house and a tent there, she said, but her husband said a house built on that spot would sink into the quicksand in no time. “He had no eye for business,” she said. “He knew just one thing-the law.” Mrs. Heacock recalled one night in the 1890s when she heard shots as she was clearing the supper table. She ran to the door to see what was happening. Her husband, the judge, called her back, telling her the safest thing to do was to lie on the floor. The cowboys had no desire to kill, but it was safer to keep out of the way of their bullets.” On one occasion, a cowboy killed a child. The cowboy was drunk and was looking for black cats to shoot. He was horrified when he realized what he had done. The townspeople hung him as an example in order to make Albuquerque safe for their children. Judge Heacock, who prosecuted the case, was so upset when the man was hung he refused thereafter to serve except as a defense lawyer.

In an interview Mrs. Heacock said they used to do funny things in Albuquerque, many of them in the name of justice. She told of a well-dressed stranger coming to town from the East. He rode a “hack” to the hotel on First Street and was paying his fare when two big deputies arrested him for being a suspicious character. “He was too well-dressed and they needed money for the city that day,” recalled Mrs. Heacock. In another instance, Judge Heacock sent El Fago Baca to his own jail for a month. The judge was low on funds and dispatched his deputies to find a drunk for the night court. When they tried to arrest Jesus Romero, a friend of Elfego Baca’s, Mr. Baca objected and hit one of the policemen over the head with his huge silver watch. Coincidentally, the injured man was one of Albuquerque’s favorite policemen. When the crowd saw him lying unconscious, they assisted the other deputy in escorting Mr. Baca to night court. Deputy Romero was completely forgotten. “Drunken and disorderly conduct” was the charge against Baca, who vehemently denied the allegation. “You’re crazy,” said Elfego. “Silence,” bellowed the judge. The judge wanted to delay matters until a night sergeant could check Elfego’s pockets and find out how much money he had. “I know exactly how much I’ve got,” Elfego blared at the sergeant. “$18.19. If you count a nickel less you’ll get yours later and good and plenty.” “Shut up!” said the judge, trying to assume a judicial dignity. “Well, wait and see,” replied Elfego amiably. “Guilty or not guilty” asked the court. “Not guilty!” said Elfego, “and you all know it damn well!” “Thirty days or ten dollars and costs,” said the judge. “I suppose ten dollars and costs are $17.19,” said Elfego. “You ain’t going to pull that stuff on me. I’ll take the thirty days.” A deputy escorted him to the jail in Old Town, where, unbeknownst to the judge, Elfego had recently been appointed jailer. The name of E. Baca was signed into the record and Elfego Baca received the regular seventy-five cents a day for the feeding of the prisoner. At the end of the month, Elfego was $22.50 richer for his encounter with Judge Heacock’s night court.

Understanding Insurance: What Do You Get for Your Premium?

Buying an insurance policy doesn’t give you immediate gratification in the way that buying a TV, a washing machine or any other item you use on a daily basis does. In fact, we often hear clients say:

“I’ve never been in a car accident.” Or “I never get sick.” Or “My employees have never been hurt on the job… So what am I getting for my premium?”

That’s a great question. And the answer requires a shift in thinking, as well as a little history about insurance coverage and its original purpose.

What Am I Buying?

In a nutshell, insurance is an important but intangible product. It buys you protection and peace of mind.

A good insurance policy allows you to protect:

  • Valuable assets in which you’ve invested a great deal of money, such as your home, car, boat, motorcycle or jewelry
  • People you care about and would want to help should they be physically harmed: your children, spouse and employees

Insurance also gives you peace of mind, knowing that:

  • You’re not gambling with your financial security
  • If something bad happens, it won’t financially destroy your business or put your family into bankruptcy

While you may not be able to hold these things in your hand, they are of value.

How Does Insurance Work?

The concept of “risk” is the single most important thing to understand. Insurance involves the pooling of similar types of risk and the transfer of that risk to a central entity, such as an insurance company that agrees to cover the costs of future “losses.” Depending on the type of insurance, a loss could be an illness, a car accident, a workplace injury, a hailstorm, crop damage, a fire or other life events that could prove financially devastating to an individual, family or business.

Customers pay a predictable premium in exchange for protection against such catastrophic events. In fact the term “catastrophic” is another important insurance concept. Originally, insurance was developed as protection from catastrophic, overwhelming losses, rather than everyday expenses.

A Bit of History

The origins of insurance date back to the 3rd millennia B.C., when Chinese merchants travelling treacherous river rapids would redistribute their wares across many vessels to limit loss due to any single vessel capsizing. They were, in essence, spreading their risk, much like an insurance company spreads its risk across many policies.

Insurance in the 21st Century

So here’s what you need to know about shopping for an insurance policy today:

  • You’re buying protection-an intangible product that you hope you’ll never need, but will be tremendously thankful to have should something bad happen.
  • The most basic insurance policies cover catastrophic events only-not day-to-day expenses, but the big costs that could wipe you out financially.
  • There are literally hundreds of insurance options available today, to fit every budget. Basic plans are a godsend to folks on a budget, while those who have the means may want to purchase a far more inclusive policy. The choices in between are almost limitless.
  • Your agent should be able to both simplify the complexities of insurance while presenting you with a number of options tailored to your needs and budget.

Perhaps the most important lesson about insurance: Don’t go without it. Financial catastrophes usually come hand-in-hand with emotional trauma. The last thing you need is to be worried about money at a time when you should be tending to your loved ones or employees.

If you don’t have an insurance agent, search online for someone local. Talk to several agents and pick one who doesn’t “push products” but, rather, listens to your needs and tailors a plan specifically for you. Developing a one-on-one relationship with an agent now is something you’ll be thankful for if, down the road, you, your family or your business should experience a catastrophe.